World of Amarie


this is where humor dwells

Ask me anything
best-of-imgur:

This.http://best-of-imgur.tumblr.com

best-of-imgur:

This.
http://best-of-imgur.tumblr.com

Source: best-of-imgur

The fact that this is a thing completes my life

The fact that this is a thing completes my life

Source: moretoonsgifs

anthonyplatinumice:

  • 1 pound Ground Coffee (good, Rich Roast)
  • 8 quarts Cold Water
  • Half-and-half (healthy Splash Per Serving)
  • Sweetened Condensed Milk (2-3 Tablespoons Per Serving)
  • Note: Can Use Skim Milk, 2% Milk, Whole Milk, Sugar, Artificial Sweeteners, Syrups…adapt To Your Liking!

Preparation Instructions

(Adapted from Imbibe Magazine)

In a large container, mix ground coffee with water. Cover and allow to sit at room temperature eight hours or overnight.

Line a fine mesh strainer with cheesecloth and set over a pitcher or other container. Pour coffee/water mixture through the strainer, allowing all liquid to run through. Discard grounds.

Place coffee liquid in the fridge and allow to cool. Use as needed.

To make iced coffee, pack a glass full of ice cubes. Fill glass 2/3 full with coffee liquid. Add healthy splash of half-and-half. Add 2-3 tablespoons sweetened condensed milk (can use plain sugar instead) and stir to combine. Taste and adjust half-and-half and/or sweetened condensed milk as needed.

This is so sensual it boarders on pornographic….I love it.

isobelstevenz:

harry potter meme ϟ  ten characters  (9/10) -  luna lovegood

“i think they think i’m a bit odd, you know. some people call me ‘loony’ lovegood, actually.”

Source: isobelstevenz

ghostts-in-the-wall:

thechamberofsecrets:

this girl and her boyfriend are always in first period before the bell rings giggling and whispering to each other and today he unzipped his pants and whispered “touch it” let me die

OH MY GOD

Oh I miss the classy antics of high school.

Source: thechamberofsecrets

magentamayhem:

i am perfectly fine with having other people sit on my lap but i can’t sit on other people’s laps because i’m always paranoid that i’d crush them and they’d diE

Source: crystallizedclarity

oliviawhen:

A truly unstoppable force.

Source: oliviawhen

basedona10000caloriediet:

kinzilauren:

maarkhoppus:

caucasianandwhite:

maarkhoppus:

fall out boy, paramore and justin timberlake on the iTunes top 10 charts wow hello 2006 

i wasnt even alive in 2006

image

why the fuck is a six year old on tumblr

image

Source: maarkhoppus

Source: tumboy

neurosciencestuff:

Some innate preferences shape the sound of words from birth
Languages are learned, it’s true, but are there also innate bases in the structure of language that precede experience? Linguists have noticed that, despite the huge variability of human languages, here are some preferences in the sound of words that can be found across languages. So they wonder whether this reflects the existence of a universal, innate biological basis of language. A SISSA study provides evidence to support this hypothesis, demonstrating that certain preferences in the sound of words are already active in newborn infants.
Take the sound “bl”: how many words starting with that sound can you think of? Blouse, blue, bland… Now try with “lb”: how many can you find? None in English and Italian, and even in other languages such words either don’t exist or are extremely rare. Human languages offer several examples of this kind, and this indicates that in forming words we tend to prefer certain sound combinations to others, irrespective of which language we speak. The fact that this occurs across languages has prompted linguists to hypothesize the existence of biological bases of language (in born and universal) which precede language learning in humans. Finding evidence to support his hypothesis is, however, far from easy and the debate between the proponents of this view and those who believe that language is merely the result of learning is still open. But proof supporting the “universalist” hypothesis has now been provided by a new study conducted by a research team of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste and just published in the journal PNAS.
David Gomez, a SISSA research scientist working under the supervision of Jacques Mehler and first author of the paper, and his coworkers decided to observe the brain activity of newborns. “In fact, if it is possible to demonstrate that these preferences are already present within days from birth, when the newborn baby is still unable to speak and presumably has very limited language knowledge, then we can infer that there is an inborn bias that prefers certain words to others”, comments Gomez.
“To monitor the newborns’ brain activity we used a non-invasive technique, i.e., functional near-infrared spectroscopy”, explains Marina Nespor, a SISSA neuroscientist who participated in the study. During the experiments the newborns would listen to words starting with normally “preferred” sounds (like “bl”) and others with  uncommon sounds (“lb”). “What we found was that the newborns’ brains reacted in a significantly different manner to the two types of sound” continues Nespor.
“The brain regions that are activated while the newborns are listening react differently in the two cases”, comments Gomez, “and reflect the preferences observed across languages, as well as the behavioural responses recorded in similar experiments carried out in adults”. “It’s difficult to imagine what languages would sound like if humans didn’t share a common knowledge base”, concludes Gomez. “We are lucky that this common base exists. This way, our children are born with an ability to distinguish words from “non-words” ever since birth, regardless of which language they will then go on to learn”.

neurosciencestuff:

Some innate preferences shape the sound of words from birth

Languages are learned, it’s true, but are there also innate bases in the structure of language that precede experience? Linguists have noticed that, despite the huge variability of human languages, here are some preferences in the sound of words that can be found across languages. So they wonder whether this reflects the existence of a universal, innate biological basis of language. A SISSA study provides evidence to support this hypothesis, demonstrating that certain preferences in the sound of words are already active in newborn infants.

Take the sound “bl”: how many words starting with that sound can you think of? Blouse, blue, bland… Now try with “lb”: how many can you find? None in English and Italian, and even in other languages such words either don’t exist or are extremely rare. Human languages offer several examples of this kind, and this indicates that in forming words we tend to prefer certain sound combinations to others, irrespective of which language we speak. The fact that this occurs across languages has prompted linguists to hypothesize the existence of biological bases of language (in born and universal) which precede language learning in humans. Finding evidence to support his hypothesis is, however, far from easy and the debate between the proponents of this view and those who believe that language is merely the result of learning is still open. But proof supporting the “universalist” hypothesis has now been provided by a new study conducted by a research team of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste and just published in the journal PNAS.

David Gomez, a SISSA research scientist working under the supervision of Jacques Mehler and first author of the paper, and his coworkers decided to observe the brain activity of newborns. “In fact, if it is possible to demonstrate that these preferences are already present within days from birth, when the newborn baby is still unable to speak and presumably has very limited language knowledge, then we can infer that there is an inborn bias that prefers certain words to others”, comments Gomez.

“To monitor the newborns’ brain activity we used a non-invasive technique, i.e., functional near-infrared spectroscopy”, explains Marina Nespor, a SISSA neuroscientist who participated in the study. During the experiments the newborns would listen to words starting with normally “preferred” sounds (like “bl”) and others with  uncommon sounds (“lb”). “What we found was that the newborns’ brains reacted in a significantly different manner to the two types of sound” continues Nespor.

“The brain regions that are activated while the newborns are listening react differently in the two cases”, comments Gomez, “and reflect the preferences observed across languages, as well as the behavioural responses recorded in similar experiments carried out in adults”. “It’s difficult to imagine what languages would sound like if humans didn’t share a common knowledge base”, concludes Gomez. “We are lucky that this common base exists. This way, our children are born with an ability to distinguish words from “non-words” ever since birth, regardless of which language they will then go on to learn”.